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The late 8th century burning of the church in Deventer

Ary_Scheffer,_Charlemagne_reçoit_la_soumission_de_Widukind_à_Paderborn,_(1840)

In the late eighth century, Widukind burned the church in Deventer, the grandest structure in all of Europe. This landmark event altered Europe’s history and allowed for a powerful German empire to be born. This day is remembered as “the day of wrath” even today.

In 772 A.D., the Germanic Heruli tribe swept through Europe and conquered the city of Deventer. This was a very significant event in European history, as it was the first time that a non-Christian Germanic tribe had conquered a Christian one. When the Heruli took over control of Deventer, they destroyed many of its churches and made it into their military headquarters for more than a decade. In 787 A.D. the Normans invaded and drove out the Heruli, however, thus leading to the destruction of their posts and the return of Deventer to its original state.

This day is remembered as “the day of wrath” even today.
This event was so significant because it was one of the first times that a non-Christian Germanic tribe had conquered a Christian one. The fact that this conquest occurred during such an important time in history (i.e. in the year 772) in a place of such significance in European history (i.e. in a city called Deventer) only magnified the significance of this event.

This event is remembered to this day, even though it occurred hundreds of years ago, because it is one of the most important events that occurred during the Middle Ages, and it is still taught by professors throughout Europe for this very reason.

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